Poll

...So, did DJ and his party really existed? (sorry for the ruthless "2" options)

Yes..
No...

Author Topic: Hello.  (Read 24343 times)

card9ats

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Hello.
« on: 20 February 2013 07:47:02 PM »

Hello.


Merlin

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Re: Hello.
« Reply #1 on: 20 February 2013 07:53:10 PM »
Hello,  my spidey senses are telling me that you are inth?
Can you imagine what I would do if I could do all I can?

card9ats

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Re: Hello.
« Reply #2 on: 20 February 2013 08:00:38 PM »
Yes!.

I would guess mr X is 'Aristide', Merlin - ? Ra6as , Aspen - Aesop ?

Whoelse is here?

 8) 8) 8) :)

Merlin

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Re: Hello.
« Reply #3 on: 20 February 2013 08:07:54 PM »
That's close 9/10.

Aspen = Ra6 = ju4o
Mr X = Aristide
Merlin = All versions of Merlin + Aesop
Can you imagine what I would do if I could do all I can?

card9ats

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Re: Hello.
« Reply #4 on: 20 February 2013 08:16:37 PM »
Hehe.

Through other SMF forums the option of changing thy username was available. Just created this in haste, maybe I would consider a change in the future.

There 's a bit like mist/mystery here ... like looking through the fog but not like the fog being heavy.

-

card9ats

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Four directions
« Reply #5 on: 20 February 2013 08:53:46 PM »

Everything is a rock
There are many rocks
You have to search for your own rock
To find what isn't a rock

~Four directions

ju4o

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Re: Four directions
« Reply #6 on: 23 February 2013 05:45:41 PM »
In cacm.acm.org/magazines/2012/10/155532 (http://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2012/10/155532/fulltext) Geoffrey Landis imagines a race of beings known as the gwyrxia.

Quote
Their name is not gwyrxia, of course. They do not communicate with sound waves, and, in fact, any sound waves humans can hear are of such low frequency the gwyrxia would not have considered even the possibility they might be a means of communication. They communicate with a spread-spectrum electromagnetic radiation, so efficiently encoded that, if we humans even detected it, we would think of it as indistinguishable from thermal noise. Gwyrxia is what it would sound like—sort of—if you could decipher their name for themselves out of that pink noise.

Rather slowly, they decided to colonize the galaxy.  They "...knew they would have to abandon organic bodies. They needed a more durable form. This they did many billions of years ago. The most efficient encoding of a mind is to imprint the patterns of their consciousness into electron spin states, using a quantum computation as a form of thinking. They implemented this quantum computation in the spin states of the valence-band electrons of silicon-oxygen bonds in silicate rock. Silicate rock seemed a reasonable matrix, since there is plenty of it in the universe."

This is one answer to Fermi's question which (in consideration of the overwhelmingly high probability that conscious life on earth is not a unique phenomenon in the universe) asks, "Where is everybody?"

(wiki)
Quote
In 1950, while working at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Fermi had a casual conversation while walking to lunch with colleagues Emil Konopinski, Edward Teller and Herbert York. The men discussed a recent spate of UFO reports and an Alan Dunn cartoon facetiously blaming the disappearance of municipal trashcans on marauding aliens. They then had a more serious discussion regarding the chances of humans observing faster-than-light travel by some material object within the next ten years, which Teller put at one in a million, but Fermi put closer to one in ten. The conversation shifted to other subjects, until during lunch Fermi suddenly exclaimed, "Where are they?" (alternatively, "Where is everybody?"). One participant recollects that Fermi then made a series of rapid calculations using estimated figures. According to this account, he then concluded that Earth should have been visited long ago and many times over.

More formally,

Quote
The Fermi paradox is the apparent contradiction between high estimates of the probability of the existence of extraterrestrial civilization and humanity's lack of contact with, or evidence for, such civilizations. The basic points of the argument are:

-    The Sun is a young star. There are billions of stars in the galaxy that are billions of years older;
-    Some of these stars likely have Earth-like planets which, if the Earth is typical, may develop intelligent life;
-    Presumably some of these civilizations will develop interstellar travel, a technology Earth is investigating even now;
-    At any practical pace of interstellar travel, the galaxy can be completely colonized in just a few tens of millions of years.

According to this line of thinking, the Earth should have already been colonized, or at least visited. But no convincing evidence of this exists. Furthermore, no confirmed signs of intelligence elsewhere have been spotted, either in our galaxy or the more than 80 billion other galaxies of the observable universe. Hence Fermi's question "Where is everybody?".

In Landis's scenario, the gwyrxia

Quote
... have barely noticed us, so far ... audible frequency pressure waves do not matter much to them, and only since humans have been using radio waves—barely 100 years—has there been even a possibility of their being able to detect us. They communicate very slowly ... a century here or a millennium there is not terribly important to them.

So they are only just beginning to notice us.

For decades, we have been wondering, where are they?

The answer is, all around us.

We call them "rocks."

card9ats

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Re: Four directions
« Reply #7 on: 23 February 2013 06:29:41 PM »

magnificent!

card9ats

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The Myth of weed
« Reply #8 on: 24 February 2013 07:20:34 PM »

weed cannabis hashish

I don't know much about the dierection of the forum.

But I 'd like to hear points / views / opinions or anything else about this subject .....

I used to smoke so I can share experiences and *pieces* of knowledge.

~ ~ ~


ju4o

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Re: The Myth of weed
« Reply #9 on: 25 February 2013 01:15:09 PM »


The ancient bronze script (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronze_script) for ma 麻 "cannabis" depicted plants hanging in a shed.

card9ats

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Re: The Myth of weed
« Reply #10 on: 26 February 2013 06:44:49 PM »

Sorry for the inconvenience
I hope such 3 day edit is acceptable.

Sensed something weird with the previous video I 've posted and replaced it with one other without the cinematic introduction.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUamtRE0dlM

 :'(
« Last Edit: 27 February 2013 08:53:37 PM by card9ats »

card9ats

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Re: The Myth of weed
« Reply #11 on: 26 February 2013 07:44:25 PM »

Still, I don't know the direction of the forum ...so I am on my toes

Not that it feels bad.  :pop:

âspen

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Re: The Myth of weed
« Reply #12 on: 27 February 2013 01:05:28 AM »

Direction wards

card9ats

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Re: The Myth of weed
« Reply #13 on: 27 February 2013 01:19:52 PM »

                     

                             ~
« Last Edit: 27 February 2013 01:21:27 PM by card9ats »

âspen

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Re: The Myth of weed
« Reply #14 on: 27 February 2013 03:00:13 PM »
The raskovnik or razkovniche is a magical herb in South Slavic (Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Serbian and Slovene) mythology. According to lore, the raskovnik has the magical property to unlock or uncover anything that is locked or closed. However, legends claim it is notoriously difficult to recognize the herb, and reputedly only certain chthonic animals are able to identify it.

Traditionally, it is considered that few people, if any, could actually recognize the herb. However, in Bulgarian sources the raskovnik is sometimes described as a grass resembling a leaf clover. It grows in meadows and may be picked either while green and blooming or in hay, when it is already dry. While it is not necessarily rare, nor does it thrive only in remote locations, it is nevertheless impossible to recognize by the uninitiated. In the words of Serbian linguist and folklorist Vuk Stefanovic Karadadzic, 'It is some (may be imaginary) grass for which it is thought that thanks to it (when brushed by it) every lock and every other closure would open by itself.'

According to the legend, the raskovnik could unlock any gate or padlock, regardless of its size, material or key. It could also uncover treasures buried in the ground: in Bulgarian beliefs, it could split the ground at the place where a treasure lay so that people could locate it. In some regions of Serbia, the treasure itself was a black man in chains who requested that a raskovnik be brought to him. The raskovnik would break the chains and the man would disappear into the ground to be replaced by a cauldron filled with gold coins. Other supernatural properties attributed to the herb by Bulgarians include the alchemic ability to transmute iron into gold, the more general ability to make the one who picked it ever happy or wealthy. In some interpretations, the raskovnik is a wonderful plant that makes true whatever its owner desires.

As, according to Bulgarian mythology and some other traditions, tortoises were the only beings who knew the appearance of the herb and the location where it grows, such people would try to obtain the raskovnik by deceiving a tortoise. They would find a tortoise nesting site and hem it in with a fence while the tortoise is away. When it returns, the tortoise would be unable to access its eggs, so it would return with a raskovnik in order to breach the fence. Thus, the tortoise would reveal the herb and people would acquire it from the tortoise, which does not need it anymore.

While the tricking of a tortoise was the most popular method in Bulgarian mythology, in Dalmatia the legend refers to snakes, and among Serbs another version involves the locking of young hedgehogs in a box for their mother to unlock. In Serbia, one would also have to be quick to take the raskovnik, as the hedgehog would swallow it after use. In any case, turtles, snakes and hedgehogs are all animals with chthonic characteristics which were often variously associated with the underworld in South Slavic tradition.

Karadzic also mentions another Serbian method to obtain the raskovnik. He recorded a story from the town of Zemun about a merchant who desired to find the herb. The merchant locked an old woman into leg irons and let her wander in a field during the night; if the irons unlocked by themselves at a certain place, that would be a place where the raskovnik grows.

The legendary herb has entered the modern Bulgarian vocabulary as a metaphor for a magic key or a panacea in the wider sense. The phrase 'find the razkovniche' means to find the solution to a certain problem, usually a complex or difficult one. Razkovniche is also the common Bulgarian name for the plant European waterclover (Marsilea quadrifolia) which, in its appearance, has many similarities with the descriptions of the mythical raskovnik. ~wiki